Hiroshima 70th Anniversary

The city of Hiroshima commemorated the moment when in 1945 the first atomic bomb known as “Little Boy” instantly killed at least 60,000 people. Three days later, “Fat Man” killed around 40,000 others in Nagasaki.

Left picture : At the time this photo was made, smoke billowed 20,000 feet above Hiroshima while smoke from the burst of the first atomic bomb had spread over 10,000 feet on the target at the base of the rising column. Six planes of the 509th Composite Group, participated in this mission; one to carry the bomb Enola Gay, one to take scientific measurements of the blast The Great Artiste, the third to take photographs Necessary Evil the others flew approximately an hour ahead to act as weather scouts, 08/06/1945. Bad weather would disqualify a target as the scientists insisted on a visual delivery, the primary target was Hiroshima, secondary was Kokura, and tertiary was Nagasaki. Right picture : Atomic bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945, taken by Charles Levy.

Left picture : At the time this photo was made, smoke billowed 20,000 feet above Hiroshima while smoke from the burst of the first atomic bomb had spread over 10,000 feet on the target at the base of the rising column. Six planes of the 509th Composite Group, participated in this mission; one to carry the bomb Enola Gay, one to take scientific measurements of the blast The Great Artiste, the third to take photographs Necessary Evil the others flew approximately an hour ahead to act as weather scouts, 08/06/1945. Bad weather would disqualify a target as the scientists insisted on a visual delivery, the primary target was Hiroshima, secondary was Kokura, and tertiary was Nagasaki. Right picture : Atomic bombing of Nagasaki on August 9, 1945, taken by Charles Levy.

Little Boy unit on trailer cradle in pit on Tinian, before being loaded into Enola Gay's bomb bay.

Little Boy unit on trailer cradle in pit on Tinian, before being loaded into Enola Gay’s bomb bay.

The Enola Gay is a Boeing B-29 bomber, named for Enola Gay Tibbets, the mother of the pilot, Colonel Paul Tibbets.  On 6 August 1945, during the final stages of World War II, it became the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb.

The ground crew of the B-29 "Enola Gay" which atom-bombed Hiroshima, Japan.  Col. Paul W. Tibbets, the pilot is the center.  Marianas Islands.  US Army Airforce Photo

The ground crew of the B-29 “Enola Gay” which atom-bombed Hiroshima, Japan. Col. Paul W. Tibbets, the pilot is the center. Marianas Islands. US Army Airforce Photo

The bombings were credited with ending World War II, but they left the cities in ruins, with generations suffering the effects of radiation poisoning. Tens of thousands more later died from cancer and other illnesses.

The Hiroshima Genbaku Dome after the bombing.  Photo of what became later Hiroshima Peace Memorial among the ruins of buildings in Hiroshima, in early October, 1945, photo by Shigeo Hayashi.

The Hiroshima Genbaku Dome after the bombing. Photo of what became later Hiroshima Peace Memorial among the ruins of buildings in Hiroshima, in early October, 1945, photo by Shigeo Hayashi.

Hiroshima after the bombing.  Effects of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. View from the top of the Red Cross Hospital looking northwest. Frame buildings recently erected. 1945.  US Gov Photo

Hiroshima after the bombing. Effects of the atomic bomb on Hiroshima. View from the top of the Red Cross Hospital looking northwest. Frame buildings recently erected. 1945. US Navy Photo

Hiroshima Aftermath, cropped version with writing of Paul Tibbets.  Tibbets was a brigadier general in the United States Air Force and the pilot of the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb, the Enola Gay.  US Navy Photo

Hiroshima Aftermath, cropped version with writing of Paul Tibbets. Tibbets was a brigadier general in the United States Air Force and the pilot of the first aircraft to drop an atomic bomb, the Enola Gay. US Navy Photo

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